Beth Axelrod

Beth Axelrod is eBay Inc’s Senior Vice President of Human Resources, a role she has held since 2005.  eBay Inc is a Fortune 200 global commerce platform and payments leader that delivers flexible and scalable solutions that fuel merchant growth.   As eBay Inc’s CHRO, Beth is responsible for all aspects of the company’s human resources capabilities designed to drive the performance of the business including recruiting, learning and development, compensation and benefits, organization design, the continuing evolution of the company’s culture, as well as its gender diversity efforts. Beth helped create eBay Inc’s Women Initiative Network (WIN), which enables women to build lasting careers at eBay Inc and has more than doubled the number of women in leadership roles.  

Prior to joining eBay, Beth was the Chief Talent Officer of WPP Group plc, one of the world’s leading marketing communications companies, where she was also an executive director.  Before WPP, she was a principal with McKinsey & Company where she served clients’ strategy and organization needs and co-authored The War for Talent. 

Beth sits on the board of the eBay Foundation, the company’s philanthropic and social innovation arm.  She is a member of the advisory board of Bulger Partners, a private investment bank.  She sits on the advisory board of YaleWomen and the industry advisory board of the Jay H. Baker Retailing Center of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Beth holds a B.S.E. degree with a concentration in Finance from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and an MPPM from the Yale School of Management.  


Anne Balsamo

Anne Balsamo

In her recent book, Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work (Duke, 2011), Anne Balsamo offers a manifesto for rethinking the role of culture in the process of technological innovation in the 21th century.  Based on her experiences as an educator, new media designer, research scientist and entrepreneur, the book offers a series of lessons about the cultivation of the technological imagination and the cultural and ethical implications of emergent technologies.  In 2012, Dr. Balsamo was appointed the Dean of the School of Media Studies at The New School in New York City.  Previously she was a full professor at the University of Southern California in the Annenberg School of Communication and the Interactive Media Division of the School of Cinematic Arts.  From 2004-2007, she served as the Director of the Institute for Multimedia Literacy at USC where she created one of the first academic programs in multimedia literacy across the curriculum.  In 2002, she co-founded, Onomy Labs, Inc. a Silicon Valley technology design and fabrication company that builds cultural technologies.  From 1999-2002, she was a member of RED (Research on Experimental Documents), a collaborative research-design group at Xerox PARC who created experimental reading devices and new media genres.  She served as project manager and new media designer for the development of RED's interactive museum exhibit, XFR: Experiments in the Future of Reading that toured Science/Technology Museums in the U.S. from 2000-2003.  Her earlier book, Technologies of the Gendered Body: Reading Cyborg Women (Duke UP, 1996) investigated the social and cultural implications of emergent bio-technologies.


Emily Bazelon

Emily Bazelon

Emily Bazelon is the author of the national bestseller Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy. She is a senior editor at Slate, a contributing writer at the New York Times Magazine, and the Truman Capote Fellow for Creative Writing and Law at Yale Law School. She is also a frequent guest on the Colbert Report and has appeared on the PBS NewsHour, Morning Joe, Fresh Air, Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Before joining Slate, Bazelon was a Soros media fellow. She worked as an editor and writer at Legal Affairs magazine and as a law clerk on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit. Her writing has appeared in the Atlantic, O Magazine, the Washington Post, and Mother Jones, among other publications. Bazelon is a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School. 


Victoria Brescoll

Victoria Brescoll

Professor Victoria Brescoll's research focuses on the impact of stereotypes on individuals' status and power within organizations, particularly for individuals who violate gender stereotypes. Her study "Can an Angry Woman Get Ahead? Gender, Status Conferral, and Workplace Emotion Expression," published in Psychological Science, concluded that people reward men who get angry but view angry women as incompetent and unworthy of status and power in the workplace. The research was widely reported on in the popular press including the New York Times, Business Week, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, National Public Radio, and U.S. News & World Report.

Additionally, Professor Brescoll examines how having power may differentially affect men's and women's behavior at work. In 2012, she published a paper in Administrative Science Quarterly, "Who Takes the Floor and Why: Gender, Power, and Volubility in Organizations," showing that, for men, there is a strong relationship between having power and talking a lot in organizational settings (e.g., the United States Senate), but for women, there is no such relationship. Her other research interests include the cultural origins of stereotypes (e.g., the media), corporate social responsibility, and framing messages to improve health policy.

She received her MS, MPhil, and PhD in social psychology from Yale University where she was supported by a graduate research fellowship from the National Science Foundation. She completed her BA in psychology from the University of Michigan. In 2004, Professor Brescoll worked in the office of Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton under a Congressional Fellowship. 


Tomiko Brown-Nagin

Tomiko Brown-Nagin

Tomiko Brown-Nagin is an award-winning legal historian and expert in constitutional law and education law and policy. Her 2011 book, Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement (Oxford), won the Bancroft Prize in US History, the highest honor awarded annually to a work in the field of history. Prior to joining the Harvard faculty, Brown-Nagin held joint appointments in law and history at the University of Virginia and at Washington University. Before entering academia, Brown-Nagin clerked for the Honorable Robert L. Carter of the U. S. District Court, Southern District of New York, and for the Honorable Jane Roth of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. She also worked as a litigation associate at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison in New York City. Brown-Nagin currently is at work on two book projects. One book argues that in today's hypercompetive admissions environment, selective institutions of higher education are obligated to ensure access for talented, first-generation and economically disadvantaged college students. The second book is a biography of the Honorable Constance Baker Motley. Brown-Nagin earned a law degree from Yale, where she served as an editor of the Yale Law Journal, a doctorate in history from Duke, and a B.A. in history, summa cum laude, from Furman University.


Kimberly M. Goff-Crews

Kimberly M. Goff-Crews

Kimberly M. Goff-Crews Secretary and Vice President for Student Life, joined the University in August 2012. She serves as Secretary of the Yale Corporation, supports institutional governance, oversees the University Chaplaincy, and ensures the alignment of University-wide policies and procedures to maximize support for all students. She is also responsible for the conduct of official University functions, including Commencement.

After several years in private law practice, Ms. Goff-Crews returned to Yale as Assistant Dean in Yale College and Director of the Afro-American Cultural Center from 1992 through 1998. During that time, she designed and implemented a wide range of programs to support student development, including improvements to Freshmen Orientation, tutoring programs, and the Yale Summer School. She focused in particular on enhancing the African American student experience at Yale and improving retention rates for women and students of color in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields through the creation of the Science, Technology, and Research Scholars (STARS) program.

From Yale she moved to Lesley University in Boston in 1998, where she served as Associate Dean in the Graduate School of Arts and Social Sciences and then as Chief of Staff to the President and Director of Planning. In that position she supported senior administrators, trustees, and faculty on faculty development, curricular reform, and strategic planning. From 2003 to 2007, she served as Dean of Students at Wellesley College, where she worked effectively to revise student disciplinary processes and upgrade student services.

Ms. Goff-Crews most recently held the position of Vice President for Campus Life and Dean of Students at the University of Chicago, where she was responsible for the oversight and strategic direction of student services and student life across the university. She represented student interests with numerous university offices and worked very successfully to enhance graduate student life as well as to enhance the campus environment for faculty, students, and staff. Her achievements included the development of an integrated student housing plan and improved access to health and wellness programs.

Ms. Goff-Crews is a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School. Recently she served as one of the four alumni on Yale's Advisory Committee on Campus Climate. She is a member of the board of United Educators, an insurance company that serves educational institutions, as well as of the board of the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA).


Inderpal Grewal

Inderpal Grewal

Inderpal Grewal is Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Most recently she has taught at University of California, Irvine, where she was director of Women’s Studies and of the PhD Program in Culture and Theory.. Her research interests include transnational feminist theory; gender and globalization, human rights; NGO’s and theories of civil society; theories of travel and mobility; South Asian cultural studies, and postcolonial feminism. She is the author of Home and Harem: Nation, Gender, Empire and the Cultures of Travel (Duke University Press, 1996) and Transnational America: Feminisms, Diasporas, Neoliberalisms (Duke University Press, 2005), and (with Caren Kaplan) has written and edited Gender in a Transnational World: Introduction to Women’s Studies (Mc-Graw Hill 2001, 2005) and Scattered Hegemonies: Postmodernity and Transnational: Feminist Practices (University of Minnesota Press, 1994). Currently she is working on a book length project on the relation between feminist practices and security discourses. She is also co-editing (with Victoria Bernal, UC Irvine, Anthropology) an edited collection entitled “The NGO Boom: Critical Feminist. Practices.


Laura Grondin

Laura Grondin

Laura Grondin is President & CEO of Virginia Industries, Inc., a privately-held industrial products company headquartered in Rocky Hill, CT.  Through its subsidiaries Bingham & Taylor, Hartford Technologies, Precision Threaded Products and VI Facility Services, the company supplies a diverse range of products including meter and valve boxes, balls, bearings, and components to the gas and water, automotive, aerospace and industrial markets.  The company operates manufacturing and distribution facilities in the US and in China.

Ms. Grondin currently serves on the Board of the American Foundry Society (Regional Vice President), The Committee of 200 (Chair-Elect and Secretary), and YaleWomen, Inc. (Chair).  She is a member of the New England Advisory Council to the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.  She is an active participant in Vistage, an international organization of CEOs.

Ms. Grondin earned her B.A. from Yale University in 1985. 


Catharine Hill

Catharine Hill

Catharine Hill became the 10th president of Vassar College in July 2006. Hill is a noted economist whose work focuses on higher education affordability and access, as well as on economic development and reform in Africa. Under Hill’s leadership, Vassar has reinstated need-blind admissions and replaced loans with grants in financial aid for low-income families.

Hill established a first-of-its-kind veterans admission partnership with the Posse Foundation, with Vassar enrolling its first eleven veterans as freshmen last year and its next group of ten veterans as part of this year's freshmen class.

Prior to her Vassar presidency, Hill served seven years as the provost of Williams College. Hill originally joined the economics faculty at Williams in 1985.

Hill holds degrees from Williams College, Oxford University, and Yale University. Hill is a trustee of The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, Ithaka Harbors, Inc. and an alumni fellow to the Yale Corporation. 


Paula Kavathas

Paula Kavathas

Dr. Paula Kavathas graduated with a B.A. in American Institutions, from the University of Wisconsin, writing her thesis on the role of Science in America in the 1960s. She obtained her Ph.D. in Genetics from the Department of Genetics, founded in 1921 as the first Genetics Department in the country. At Wisconsin with Dr. Robert DeMars on genetic analysis of the MHC region. As a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University with Dr. Leonard Herzenberg she developed a novel approach for cloning genes for cell surface proteins using the fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS).

At Yale she continued her studies on CD8 and recently has focused on the functional relevance of four isoforms of the CD8b protein that exist in humans and great apes but not mice. They are differentially expressed in naive T cells, activated T cells, and memory T cells. Signal transduction by the isoforms is different given that they differ only in their cytoplasmic tail. The clinical relevance of these isoforms for adoptive immunotherapy with T cells is one focus of the lab.


Linda Koch Lorimer

Linda Koch Lorimer

Linda Koch Lorimer is the Officer who developed and oversees Yale’s Office of International Affairs, which supports all of the Schools and faculties in pursuing strategic partnerships abroad, and is the liaison to Yale’s Office of International Students and Scholars. She is also responsible for a broad array of administrative services including Yale’s public affairs and communications efforts, the Broadcast Center, the Office of Digital Dissemination, the Yale Press as well as alumni relations.

During her career, Ms. Lorimer has been asked to develop and lead a number of strategic institutional initiatives. For five years she was responsible for Yale’s efforts to contribute to the revitalization of the city of New Haven. In recent years, she helped to develop an ambitious strategy and numerous programs for internationalizing Yale. She currently is the administrative leader guiding the dissemination of the University’s intellectual treasury much more extensively in this country and around the world. She assumed oversight of Yale’s sustainability initiative during 2009-13, when Yale advanced its efforts to be a model of best practice for universities worldwide.

Ms. Lorimer served as Secretary of the Yale Corporation from 1993-2012, where she was responsible for a range of institutional governance matters. She became Secretary & Vice President in 1995 and was appointed Vice President for Global and Strategic Initiatives in 2013.

A graduate of Norfolk Academy, Hollins University, and Yale Law School, Ms. Lorimer practiced law in New York City at Davis Polk & Wardwell and then held a series of administrative positions at Yale between 1978 and 1986, including service as the youngest Associate Provost in the University’s history. From 1986 to 1993 Ms. Lorimer served as President of Randolph–Macon Woman’s College in her home state of Virginia. During this period, she was elected as a Fellow of the Yale Corporation and served as a Yale trustee from 1990 to 1993 when she returned to Yale.

Ms. Lorimer has been a leader of numerous nonprofit and corporate enterprises. She was Chair of the Board of the Association of American Colleges and Universities, Vice Chair of the Board of the Center for Creative Leadership, Chair of the Board of the Women’s College Coalition, Vice Chair of the National Association of Methodist Colleges and Universities, and a member of the boards of a dozen regional community or arts organizations. She has given board service to all of her alma maters as well as four public corporations. She currently serves on the Board of the McGraw Hill Financial, having served as the Lead Director for five years. She was elected as a Director of Pearson PLC in 2013.

Ms. Lorimer was awarded the Order of Merit by the Government of Argentina for advancing international education (2003), the Sandra Day O’Connor Award by the American Bar Association for board excellence (2008), and the Yale Medal for conspicuous service to Yale (2008). She has received four honorary degrees for her efforts to advance women.


Serena Mayeri

Serena Mayeri

Serena Mayeri is Professor of Law and History at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Mayeri’s scholarship focuses on the historical impact of progressive and conservative social movements on legal and constitutional change. Her history of feminist legal advocacy in the 1960s and 1970s, Reasoning from Race: Feminism, Law, and the Civil Rights Revolution (Harvard University Press, 2011; paperback edition 2014) received the Littleton-Griswold Prize from the American Historical Association and the Darlene Clark Hine Award from the Organization of American Historians. She is currently at work on a new project, tentatively titled, The Status of Marriage: Marital Supremacy Challenged and Remade, which investigates challenges to the legal primacy of marriage since 1960.

Mayeri is also the author of several law review articles, as well as book chapters in collections including Civil Rights Stories, Women and the Law Stories, and Public Opinion and Constitutional Controversy. She has taught courses in women’s legal history, the law and history of marriage, social movements and the law in American history, employment discrimination law, and family law. Prior to coming to Penn in 2006, she was a Samuel I. Golieb Fellow in legal history at the New York University School of Law, and served as a law clerk to Judge Guido Calabresi on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. An alumna of Harvard/Radcliffe College, she earned a J.D. and a Ph.D. in History from Yale. Her dissertation received the Lerner-Scott Prize from the Organization of American Historians and Yale’s George Washington Eggleston Prize.


Kathleen McCartney

Kathleen McCartney

Kathleen McCartney is the 11th president of Smith College, a position she assumed in July 2013. A summa cum laude graduate of Tufts University, she earned master’s and doctoral degrees in psychology from Yale University. She is an authority on child development and a leader in higher education.  As she begins her presidency, she is focusing on outreach to the Smith community, including  alumnae around the world. Already, she has launched important conversations on access and affordability, innovative approaches to liberal arts, and the capacities needed for students to succeed and lead.

McCartney was previously dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE)—only the  fifth woman dean in Harvard’s history. She doubled HGSE’s financial aid for master’s students, raised funds for international faculty research, and dramatically increased fellowship support for doctoral students. A signature accomplishment of her tenure was the creation of a three-year doctorate in educational leadership designed in collaboration with the Harvard Business School and Kennedy School of Government. 

McCartney’s research has focused on childcare and early childhood experience, education policy, parenting, poverty, and behavior genetics. She has authored some 150 articles and book chapters and was a principal researcher for a 20-year study of the effects of child care on child development. She is a fellow of the  American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Education, the American Educational Research Association, the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. She was the recipient in 2009 of the Distinguished Contribution Award from the Society for Research in Child Development. In recognition of her thoughtful and creative leadership at HGSE, The Boston Globe in 2011 named her one of the 30 most innovative people in Massachusetts. 

In 2013, she received the Harvard College Women’s Professional Achievement Award, which honors an 
individual who has demonstrated exceptional leadership in her professional field.


Mary Miller

Mary Miller

Mary Miller, Sterling Professor of History of Art, served as dean of Yale College from December 2008 until June 2014. Before assuming the deanship, Miller served as master of Saybrook College for nearly a decade.

Miller earned her A.B. from Princeton in 1975 and her Ph.D. from Yale in 1981, joining the faculty in that year. She has served as chair of the Department of History of Art, chair of the Council on Latin American Studies, director of Graduate Studies in Archeological Studies, and as a member of the Steering Committee of the Women Faculty Forum at Yale.

A specialist of the art of the ancient New World, Miller curated The Courtly Art of the Ancient Maya at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in 2004. For that exhibition, she wrote the catalogue of the same title with Simon Martin, senior epigrapher at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. Among her other books are The Murals of Bonampak, The Blood of Kings (with Linda Schele), The Art of Mesoamerica, Maya Art and Architecture, The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya (with Karl Taube), and A Pre-Columbian World (co-edited with Jeffrey Quilter). She has most recently completed Painting a Map of Mexico City (co-edited with Barbara Mundy; 2012, a study of the rare indigenous map in the Beinecke Library) and The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court: Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak (with Claudia Brittenham; 2013).

For her work on ancient Mexico and the Maya, Miller has won national recognition including a Guggenheim Fellowship. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994. In April and May of 2010 she delivered the Fifty-ninth A W Mellon lectures at the National Gallery of Art. She is scheduled to deliver the Slade Lectures at Cambridge University during the academic year 2014-2015.


Marta Elisa Moret

Marta Elisa Moret

Marta Elisa Moret is president of Urban Policy Strategies, a New Haven-based consulting firm that conducts research and assessment in public health. UPS evaluates the impact of community-based interventions in areas such as HIV/AIDS, childhood obesity, substance abuse, and cardiovascular diseases. UPS uses evidence-based approaches to enhance the capacity of African-American, Latino, and Native American community organizations to implement successful disease prevention programs. This work has served as a model for community-academic partnerships in addressing public health issues facing underserved families and children. 

Previously, Ms. Moret was the deputy commissioner for the Connecticut Department of Social Services, vice-president for program at the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, and program director at Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation. Ms. Moret is on the board of Women’s Health Research at Yale.  She is a member of Hispanics in Philanthropy and the Eastern Evaluation Association. She has served Yale as a member of the Yale Alumni Association’s Board of Governors and was assistant director and a fellow of the Bush Center in Child Development and Social Policy (now the Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy).  She earned her Master of Public Health degree from the Yale School of Public Health in 1984.


Benjamin Polak

Benjamin Polak

Benjamin Polak, the William C. Brainard Professor of Economics, was named provost in January 2013. As provost he facilitates strategic planning, long-term decision making, and the allocation of resources in order to promote academic excellence in all parts of the University. In addition, he oversees design and implementation of policies affecting faculty and students throughout the University. Mr. Polak holds a B.A. from Cambridge University, an M.A. in history from Northwestern University, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

Mr. Polak joined the Yale faculty in 1994 and holds a joint appointment in the Economics department, where he served as chair from 2010 to 2013, and the School of Management. He also has served as a member of the University Budget Committee, a member of the executive committees of the MacMillan Center and the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, a fellow of the Whitney Humanities Center, and a visitor at the Law School. Before coming to Yale, he was a junior fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows and a visiting professor in the inaugural year of the New Economic School in Moscow. He has also held visiting appointments at the Australian National University, the London School of Economics, New York University, and the University of Melbourne, Australia.

An expert on decision theory and economic history, Mr. Polak teaches a popular course on game theory, which is featured on Yale Online Courses. He has published numerous papers in leading economic journals and has studied topics such as how individuals make decisions when faced with uncertainty and how societies choose when faced with inequality. His work on game theory ranges from foundational theoretical work on common knowledge to applied topics in corporate finance, law, and economics. His earlier research includes the emergence of a capital market in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; property transactions in Ireland from the early eighteenth century to modern times; and past correlations between poverty, policy, and industrialization. 

Mr. Polak has been honored with three major University teaching prizes: Yale College’s Lex Hixon ’63 Prize for Teaching Excellence in the Social Sciences (2006); the Department of Economics’ Graduate Teaching Prize (2005); and the William Clyde DeVane Medal for undergraduate teaching and scholarship at Yale College (2005). He and his wife, Stefanie Markovits, a professor of English at Yale, live in New Haven with their three children.


Frances Rosenbluth

Frances Rosenbluth

Frances Rosenbluth is a comparative political economist with current research interests in war and constitutions, Japanese politics and political economy, and the political economy of gender. She has received research support from the Fulbright Commission, the National Science Foundation, the Council on Foreign Affairs, and the Abe Foundation. Her recent and forthcoming books include The Political Economy of Japan’s Low Fertility (edited, Stanford Press, 2007), Women, Work, and Politics (with Torben Iversen, Yale University Press, 2010), Japan Transformed: Political Change and Economic Reform (with Michael Thies, Princeton University Press, 2010), and War and State Building in Medieval Japan (co-edited with John Ferejohn, Stanford University Press, 2010). She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


Peter Salovey

Peter Salovey

Peter Salovey is the 23rd president of Yale University, and the Chris Argyris Professor of Psychology. His presidential term began in July 2013.

Prior to becoming president, Salovey served as the provost of Yale University from 2008 to 2013. As provost, Salovey facilitated strategic planning and initiatives such as: enhancing career development and mentoring opportunities for all Yale faculty members; promoting faculty diversity; creating the Office of Academic Integrity; establishing the University-wide Committee on Sexual Misconduct; developing the West Campus; and overseeing the University’s budget during the global financial crisis.

Other leadership roles at Yale have included: chair of the Department of Psychology from 2000 to 2003; dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 2003 and 2004; and dean of Yale College from 2004 to 2008.

After receiving an A.B. (psychology) and A.M. (sociology) from Stanford University in 1980 with departmental honors and university distinction, Salovey earned three degrees at Yale in psychology: an M.S. (1983), M.Phil. (1984), and Ph.D. (1986). Since joining the Yale faculty in 1986, he has studied the connection between human emotion and health behavior, and played key roles in multiple Yale programs including: the Health, Emotion, and Behavior Laboratory, which Salovey founded and is now called the Center for Emotional Intelligence; the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS; and the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program. He currently holds secondary faculty appointments in the Schools of Management and Public Health, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Sociology Department.

Salovey has authored or edited over a dozen books translated into eleven languages and published hundreds of journal articles and essays, focused primarily on human emotion and health behavior. With John D. Mayer, he developed a broad framework called “Emotional Intelligence,” the theory that just as people have a wide range of intellectual abilities, they also have a wide range of measurable emotional skills that profoundly affect their thinking and action.

In addition to teaching and mentoring scores of graduate students, Salovey has won both the William Clyde DeVane Medal for Distinguished Scholarship and Teaching in Yale College and the Lex Hixon '63 Prize for Teaching Excellence in the Social Sciences. He has received honorary doctorates from the University of Pretoria in South Africa and Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies in 2013.

Salovey and his wife, Marta Elisa Moret, have lived in New Haven since they arrived as graduate students more than 30 years ago. Moret, a 1984 graduate of the Yale School of Public Health, is the president of Urban Policy Strategies, LLC, which provides program evaluation and technical assistance to community-based health organizations. Moret is also active with the Association of Yale Alumni and has served on its board of governors. She previously held positions in the Edward Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy, the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, and the Hispanic Health Council. Moret was the deputy commissioner for the Connecticut Department of Social Services from 1991 to 1994.


Kimberlee Shauman

Kimberlee Shauman

Kimberlee Shauman is a professor of sociology at the University of California, Davis. Her main areas of interest are social stratification, family and kinship, demography, sociology of education, and quantitative methodology. Her research focuses on gender differences in educational and occupational trajectories with particular attention to the causal effects of family characteristics. Her book, Women in Science: Career Processes and Outcomes (Harvard University Press, 2006; co-authored with Yu Xie), examines the underrepresentation of women in science from a life course perspective. In addition to on-going studies of gender differences in the attainment of STEM degrees, she has studied the career causes and consequences of family migration among dual-earner couples, field-specific gender differences in the utilization of educational credentials, the influence of anti-discrimination laws on gender inequality in the labor market, and the demographic consequences of persistent racial differences in mortality.


Susan Sturm

Susan Sturm

Susan Sturm is the George M. Jaffin Professor of Law and Social Responsibility and the founding director of the Center for Institutional and Social Change at Columbia Law School. Her work focuses on building “the architecture of full participation,” making education central in reentry, institutional change, transformative leadership, workplace equality, legal education, and inclusion and diversity in educational institutions. She collaborates with a wide variety of higher education and community based organizations and networks involved in initiatives aimed at increasing full participation, including the Creating Connections Consortium, the New York Reentry Education Network, Aspen Ascend Network, College and Community Fellowship, LADO (Liberal Arts Diversity Officers), Imagining America, Rutgers Future Scholars, University of Michigan, and Harvard Business School.  Her publications and reports include:  Equality and Inequality in the Law: Legal Aspects; Reframing the Civil Rights Narrative: From Compliance to Collective Impact; Linked Fates and Futures: A Multi-Generational Approach to Higher Education for Justice-Involved Women and Their Families (2013); Full Participation: Building the Architecture for Diversity and Public Engagement in Higher Education, www.fullparticipation.net (2011); Activating Systemic Change Toward Full Participation: The Pivotal Role of Mission-Driven Institutional Intermediaries; Second Generation Employment Discrimination: A Structural Approach, and Who’s Qualified?  (with Lani Guinier, 2001).  Sturm is the principal investigator for two Ford Foundation grants awarded to develop strategies for advancing post-secondary education for communities affected by incarceration, immigrants and veterans, and an Aspen Ascend grant to develop multi-generational strategies for advancing higher education for communities affected by the criminal justice system. She has co-chaired a working group on Transformative Leadership, as part of a Ford Foundation funded project on Building Knowledge for Social Justice. In 2007, she received the Presidential Teaching Award for Outstanding Teaching at Columbia.


Julie Suk

Julie Suk

Julie Suk is a Professor of Law at the Cardozo School of Law – Yeshiva University.  She is a leading scholar of comparative law and antidiscrimination law.  She was a Jean Monnet fellow at the European University Institute in Florence and a Law and Public Affairs fellow at Princeton University.  She was a visiting professor at Harvard, the University of Chicago, and UCLA.  Before entering law teaching, she clerked on the D.C. Circuit.  She obtained her A.B. summa cum laude from Harvard in English and French literature, a J.D. from Yale Law School, where she held a Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship, and a D.Phil. in Politics from Oxford University, where she was a Marshall Scholar.

Professor Suk’s publications include Are Gender Stereotypes Bad for Women? (Columbia Law Review), and Discrimination at Will (Stanford Law Review).  Her current research examines gender quotas in Europe and race and class quotas in Latin America, and their potential to transform equality law, transnationally.  She recently served as Chair of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) Section on Comparative Law, and the Section on Employment Discrimination.  She is a founding executive committee member of the newly formed AALS Section on European Law.  


Debbie Walsh

Debbie Walsh

Debbie Walsh is director of the Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP), a unit of the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University. CAWP is nationally recognized as the leading source of scholarly research and current data about American women's political participation. Its mission is to promote greater knowledge and understanding about women's participation in politics and government and to enhance women's influence and leadership in public life. 

Walsh joined the Center staff in 1981. As director she manages and oversees CAWP's multi-facited programs that include:

  • leadership and campaign training programs that empower women of all ages to participate fully in politics and public life;
  • research illuminating women's distinctive contributions, roles and experiences in politics and government, including the impact of women officeholders and women's routes to elective office; and
  • up-to-the-minute information and historical perspectives about women as candidates, public officials and voters.

Walsh is frequently called upon by the media for information and comment, and she speaks to a variety of audiences across the country on topics related to women's political participation. She is a member of the Circle of Advisors to Rachel's Network.  She earned her bachelor's degree in political science from SUNY Binghamton and her M.A. in political science from Rutgers, where she was an Eagleton Fellow.

CAWP's education and outreach programs translate research findings into action, addressing women's under-representation in political leadership with effective, innovative programs serving a variety of audiences.  As the world has watched Americans considering female candidates for the nation's highest offices, CAWP's over four decades of analyzing and interpreting women's participation in American politics have provided a foundation and context for the discussion. CAWP's latest research report, Poised to Run, provides an unprecedented look at how women reach state legislatures and how women's election to office has changed over time.

CAWP's newest initiative, Teach a Girl to Lead™,  is a unique resource that connects educators, leaders of youth organizations, parents, authors, librarians, women leaders and students in order to refocus the picture of public leadership to include women. The new Teach a Girl to Lead™ web site offers one-stop shopping for anyone interested in expanding civic engagement and public leadership opportunities for girls and young women. Resources available on the web site help educate both boys and girls about the importance of civic participation and the significant roles women have played and continue to play in our democracy.


Teresa Younger

Teresa Younger

Teresa Younger has been on the frontlines of some of the most important battles for women's health, safety and economic security. She is a tireless advocate and well-respected feminist leader, with a proven track record in nonprofit management and fundraising.

Younger most recently served as the executive director of the Connecticut General Assembly’s Permanent Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW), where she has spearheaded successful campaigns for women’s health, safety and economic empowerment.

During her tenure at PCSW, Younger has been instrumental in campaigns that resulted in state legislation to raise the minimum wage and provide paid sick leave in Connecticut. Younger successfully safeguarded women’s access to reproductive health care during hospital mergers. She also helped strengthen sexual assault legislation to hold college campuses accountable for the prevention and reporting of sexual assaults. 

Younger has a deep history of national leadership that empowers women. She is a board member of the Women’s Campaign School at Yale University, whose mission is to increase the number and influence of women in elected and appointed office in the United States and around the globe. She serves on the National Advisory Board on Religious Restrictions on Care, which works to protect hospital-based health care services, such as birth control, that are threatened by mergers between secular community hospitals and religious-based health systems. 

Younger was the first woman and the first African-American to serve as executive director of the ACLU of Connecticut. She subsequently served as director of affiliate organizational development at the American Civil Liberties Union National Office, where she spearheaded affiliate growth nationwide. 

Younger has deep experience in nonprofit governance and philanthropy. She has recently concluded her role as two-term president on the board of the Girl Scouts of Connecticut, which serves 46,000 Connecticut girls and 20,000 volunteers. Younger also serves on several other boards — including the Universal Health Care Foundation of Connecticut — and she previously served on the board of the National Association of Commissions for Women.  

A noted speaker, advocate and activist, she has been recognized with numerous awards for her commitment to civil rights and civil liberties, including in 2013: Liberty Bank’s Willard M. McRae Community Diversity Award, the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame Education and Empowerment Honoree, and the Girl Scouts of Connecticut Breakfast Badge Award. 

In 2013, she was also named a Henry Toll Fellow by The Council of State Governments, one of the nation's premiere leadership development programs, as well as a fellow in the William Caspar Graustein Courageous Community Fellowship. In 2010, Younger went to Saudi Arabia as part of The Global Women’s Leadership Institute, a networking and economic development project. In 2009, she was chosen to participate in the National Council of State Legislatures Legislative Staff Management Institute.

She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of North Dakota.